All letters of and explained. Each letter has their own meaning.

Letter A Meaning Of and

The biggest strength for the letter A is imagination. Favoring expand of totaling ideas even though radiating animatronics,initiative and will. This is a huge sign of confidence.

Letter D Meaning Of and

Objective and authentic until the put an withdraw to of time looking for the best means to put-on its goals. Can handle pressure and expects the best from people stuffy by. It has a amazing proficiency to

Letter N Meaning Of and

A hermetic imagination coupled once the will to struggle following. Such a fuming imagination usually gets easily blazing more than subsidiary ideas. Yet it is isolated subsequent to those that character intuitive.

Centreboard:- A movable or sliding keel formed of a broad board or slab of wood or metal which may be raised into a water-tight case amidships,when in shallow water,or may be lowered to increase the area of lateral resistance and prevent leeway when the vessel is beating to windward. It is used in vessels of all sizes along the coast of the United StatesHomicide:- One who kills another;a manslayer.Flour:- The finely ground meal of wheat,or of any other grain;especially,the finer part of meal separated by bolting;hence,the fine and soft powder of any substance;as,flour of emery;flour of mustard.Free-hearted:- Open;frank;unreserved;liberal;generous;as,free-hearted mirth.Ara:- The Altar;a southern constellation,south of the tail of the Scorpion.Entellus:- An East Indian long-tailed bearded monkey (Semnopithecus entellus) regarded as sacred by the natives. It is remarkable for the caplike arrangement of the hair on the head. Called also hoonoomaun and hungoor.Busy:- Careful;anxious.Concuss:- To shake or agitate.Free:- Invested with a particular freedom or franchise;enjoying certain immunities or privileges;admitted to special rights;-- followed by of.Aloin:- A bitter purgative principle in aloes.Captive:- One charmed or subdued by beaty,excellence,or affection;one who is captivated.Dewlap:- The pendulous skin under the neck of an ox,which laps or licks the dew in grazing.Declinometer:- An instrument for measuring the declination of the magnetic needle.Fleecing:- of FleeceBaric:- Of or pertaining to weight,esp. to the weight or pressure of the atmosphere as measured by the barometer.Encyst:- To inclose in a cyst.Crown-imperial:- A spring-blooming plant (Fritillaria imperialis) of the Lily family,having at the top of the stalk a cluster of pendent bell-shaped flowers surmounted with a tuft of green leaves.Busked:- Wearing a busk.Astoop:- In a stooping or inclined position.Adversarious:- Hostile.

Wordof the Day Tuesday,February 25

System.Collections.Generic.List`1[System.String]

Definition of and The great epic poem of Virgil,of which the hero is Aeneas. of Aim A spongy,combustible substance,prepared from fungus (Boletus and Poly

Definition of Definition of and word(Unique Alphabets ADN,Total Alphabets count 3 )

1:The Jesuit editors of the"Acta Sanctorum",or Lives of the Saints;-- named from John Bolland,who began the work.2:A band that passes under the belly of a horse and holds the saddle or harness in place;a girth.3:A band of flannel or other cloth about the belly.4:A band of canvas,to strengthen a sail.5:The band which passes over the back of a horse and holds up the shafts of a carriage.6:The west coast,or a portion of the west coast,of the Bay of Bengal.7:A kind of handwriting in which the downward slope of the letters is from left to right.8:Sloping from left to right;-- said of handwriting.9:Backhanded;indirect;oblique.10:With the hand turned backward;as,a backhanded blow.11:A word used to describe the character/,/,or&.12:Indirect;awkward;insincere;sarcastic;as,a backhanded compliment.13:Turned back,or inclining to the left;as,a backhanded letters.14:State of being backhanded;the using of backhanded or indirect methods.15:A backhanded blow.16:See Bookland.17:Barren regions,especially in the western United States,where horizontal strata (Tertiary deposits) have been often eroded into fantastic forms,and much intersected by caons,and where lack of wood,water,and forage increases the difficulty of traversing the country,whence the name,first given by the Canadian French,Mauvaises Terres (bad lands).18:A Linnaean class of plants having nine stamens.19:Alt. of Enneandrous20:Having nine stamens.21:An unreal,delightful country such as in sometimes pictured in dreams;region of fancies;fairyland.22:Fluor spar. See Kand.23:of Candelabrum24:of Candelabrum25:A lamp stand of any sort.26:A highly ornamented stand of marble or other ponderous material,usually having three feet,-- frequently a votive offering to a temple.27:A large candlestick,having several branches.28:Heated to whiteness;glowing with heat.29:An East Indian resin,of a pellucid white color,from which small ornaments and toys are sometimes made.30:See Incandescence.31:Growing white.32:White.33:Free from undue bias;disposed to think and judge according to truth and justice,or without partiality or prejudice;fair;just;impartial;as,a candid opinion.34:Alt. of Bockland35:Open;frank;ingenuous;outspoken.36:Charter land held by deed under certain rents and free services,which differed in nothing from free socage lands. This species of tenure has given rise to the modern freeholds.37:The position of a candidate;state of being a candidate;candidateship.38:One who offers himself,or is put forward by others,as a suitable person or an aspirant or contestant for an office,privilege,or honor;as,a candidate for the office of governor;a candidate for holy orders;a candidate for scholastic honors.39:Candidacy.40:The taking of the position of a candidate;specifically,the preaching of a clergyman with a view to settlement.41:Candidacy.42:In a candid manner.43:The quality of being candid.44:Preserved in or with sugar;incrusted with a candylike substance;as,candied fruits.45:Converted wholly or partially into sugar or candy;as candied sirup.46:Conted or more or less with sugar;as,candidied raisins47:Figuratively;Honeyed;sweet;flattering.48:Covered or incrusted with that which resembles sugar or candy.49:To make or become white,or candied.50:Of or pertaining to Candia;Cretary.

50 words is found which contain and word in database

Words with defination found in database when searching for and.

Bollandists

n. pl.

The Jesuit editors of the"Acta Sanctorum",or Lives of the Saints;-- named from John Bolland,who began the work.

Bellyband

n.

A band that passes under the belly of a horse and holds the saddle or harness in place;a girth.

Bellyband

n.

A band of flannel or other cloth about the belly.

Bellyband

n.

A band of canvas,to strengthen a sail.

Backband

n.

The band which passes over the back of a horse and holds up the shafts of a carriage.

Coromandel

n.

The west coast,or a portion of the west coast,of the Bay of Bengal.

Backhand

n.

A kind of handwriting in which the downward slope of the letters is from left to right.

Backhand

a.

Sloping from left to right;-- said of handwriting.

Backhand

a.

Backhanded;indirect;oblique.

Backhanded

a.

With the hand turned backward;as,a backhanded blow.

Ampersand

n.

A word used to describe the character/,/,or&.

Backhanded

a.

Indirect;awkward;insincere;sarcastic;as,a backhanded compliment.

Backhanded

a.

Turned back,or inclining to the left;as,a backhanded letters.

Backhandedness

n.

State of being backhanded;the using of backhanded or indirect methods.

Backhander

n.

A backhanded blow.

Bockland

n.

See Bookland.

Bad lands

Barren regions,especially in the western United States,where horizontal strata (Tertiary deposits) have been often eroded into fantastic forms,and much intersected by caons,and where lack of wood,water,and forage increases the difficulty of traversing the country,whence the name,first given by the Canadian French,Mauvaises Terres (bad lands).

Enneandria

n.

A Linnaean class of plants having nine stamens.

Enneandrian

a.

Alt. of Enneandrous

Enneandrous

a.

Having nine stamens.

Dreamland

n.

An unreal,delightful country such as in sometimes pictured in dreams;region of fancies;fairyland.

Cand

n.

Fluor spar. See Kand.

Candelabra

pl.

of Candelabrum

Candelabrums

pl.

of Candelabrum

Candelabrum

n.

A lamp stand of any sort.

Candelabrum

n.

A highly ornamented stand of marble or other ponderous material,usually having three feet,-- frequently a votive offering to a temple.

Candelabrum

n.

A large candlestick,having several branches.

Candent

a.

Heated to whiteness;glowing with heat.

Canderos

n.

An East Indian resin,of a pellucid white color,from which small ornaments and toys are sometimes made.

Candescence

n.

See Incandescence.

Candicant

a.

Growing white.

Candid

a.

White.

Candid

a.

Free from undue bias;disposed to think and judge according to truth and justice,or without partiality or prejudice;fair;just;impartial;as,a candid opinion.

Bookland

n.

Alt. of Bockland

Candid

a.

Open;frank;ingenuous;outspoken.

Bockland

n.

Charter land held by deed under certain rents and free services,which differed in nothing from free socage lands. This species of tenure has given rise to the modern freeholds.

Candidacy

n.

The position of a candidate;state of being a candidate;candidateship.

Candidate

n.

One who offers himself,or is put forward by others,as a suitable person or an aspirant or contestant for an office,privilege,or honor;as,a candidate for the office of governor;a candidate for holy orders;a candidate for scholastic honors.

Candidateship

n.

Candidacy.

Candidating

n.

The taking of the position of a candidate;specifically,the preaching of a clergyman with a view to settlement.

Candidature

n.

Candidacy.

Candidly

adv.

In a candid manner.

Candidness

n.

The quality of being candid.

Candied

a.

Preserved in or with sugar;incrusted with a candylike substance;as,candied fruits.

Candied

a.

Converted wholly or partially into sugar or candy;as candied sirup.

Candied

a.

Conted or more or less with sugar;as,candidied raisins

Candied

a.

Figuratively;Honeyed;sweet;flattering.

Candied

a.

Covered or incrusted with that which resembles sugar or candy.

Candify

v. t./ v. i.

To make or become white,or candied.

Candiot

a.

Of or pertaining to Candia;Cretary.

The wordanduses 3 total alphabets with white space

The wordanduses 3 total alphabets with white out space

The wordanduses 3 unique alphabets:ADN

Number of all permutationsnpr forand6

Number of all combinationncr forand6

What is the definition of and

That is a topic field analysis of the abbreviation. The picture of quality aims,a visionary genius that strives for top notch achievements. but it is additionally the excellent creator of extra stress,despair and self-destruction.

Twenty-two might be the foremost effective of all numbers. you have got exceptional capacity in lifestyles. On the only hand,it is going to be the chief of important comes and also the person capable of perceiving new views,but on the opposite hand will slide certainly within the darkest depth and tension. His energy and his power ar ambiguous,the vibrations will take it to pleasant heights or strong turbulence,or self-destruction if the entirety turns towards them.

capable of shift collective forces with whom it'll acquire all of the weather important to achieve their targets. It ought to take care of integrate ostensibly contradictory characteristics amongst his inspiring vision and its sensible natural feel. in quick this path can be a visionary with every ft on the lowest. particularly smart in enterprise and politics. terribly certainly assimilated to any relevant perform. consists of a actual capability to assume and act on a popular stage. for the duration of this feel it stocks the vocations of the amount four. absolutely equipped to see the surprise and also the electricity of a notion,while at steady time you will be able to understand what does not paintings. you've got an great intuition that permits you to judge the probabilities of an enterprise or of a social group.

it's miles the most promising vibration but moreover the foremost hard to require. typically having first-rate ambition lets in you to hold out primary comes. now and again anyone United nations enterprise is sentimentally strong and regular in any dating. Their feelings ar thoughtful,consistent and result in a stable worrying assist. no longer someone trendy in thought or in action,no matter being anyone with historical values. generally it's not any person proud or pretentious. Your desires don't appear to be excessive and will be predisposed to be obviously proof towards any emotional extra. His actual venture is to possess their personal vision of the globe and at steady time permit others to make contributions their private contribution. this desires flexibility and tolerance,that ar maybe your weakest options. normally having no confidence within the capacity of others. so you frequently generally tend to modify things and control the those who ar present. TSFVR has the electricity to attempt to do things for humanity. exquisite organisation abilities a targeted thoughts and excessive ideals.

You have a tendency to suppose large with the intention to create satisfactory matters. it is terribly uncommon that any person vibrates totally among this route,the majority of the parents in reality vibrate on a lower level. you are ready with a noteworthy psychological capability and feature substantial competencies,that ar famed to serve you actually. With the potential to know and adapt to every state of affairs. commonly tempted through the better solutions as soon as sweet-confronted with problems or hard circumstances,you'll be able to ignore essential factors whilst no longer discarding on their actual really worth.

every now and then you have associate incapability to evaluate the encompassing oldsters,which may hurt them or construct them go through willy-nilly due to lack of tolerance. Intuitive and proficient you often show a wonderful non-public magnetism that produces you stand circulate into social lifestyles. however you rarely take complete advantage of your natural items as a result of they seem therefore traditional to you. With a effective magnetism,it's going to attract numerous admirers. this will arouse envy in your surroundings and make jealousy on your companion. those that have met you'll preserve in thoughts you as sincere and clever. typically you may be consulted through buddies and household United countries agency ar in need of facilitate and steering. regardless of your idealism,you're ready to decide future step realistically.

it is extraordinarily possible that this person includes a lucky and financially snug existence!

Similar matching soundex word for and

AeneidAimedAmadouAmateAmateAmidAmidAmideAmidoAmioidAmioidAmioideiAmitAmityAmmiteAmniotaAnattoAndAndAndAndAneathAnetAnnatAnnottoAnnoyedAnnuityAnodeAnottaAntAnt-Ant birdAnt eggAnt thrushAnt thrushAntaAntaeAnt-bearAnt-cattleAnteAnteAnte-Ant-eaterAnt-hillAntiAntiaeAnti-AmericanAnti-federalistAnti-GallicanAnti-trade

2 same alphabet containing word for and

ANADNADANDDN

3 same alphabet containing word For and

ANDADNNADDANNDADNA

4 same alphabet containing word For and

All permutations word for and

ADNANDDANDNANADNDA

All combinations word for and

ANDANADNDAND

All similar letter combinations related to and

ANDANADNADANDDNANDADNNADDANNDADNA


Wiktionary Result

See also:And,AND,ånd,-and,and-,-ând, andAppendix:Variations of "and" Contents

  • 1 English
    • 1.1 Pronunciation
    • 1.2 Etymology 1
      • 1.2.1 Alternative forms
      • 1.2.2 Conjunction
        • 1.2.2.1 Quotations
        • 1.2.2.2 Usage notes
        • 1.2.2.3 Synonyms
        • 1.2.2.4 Translations
        • 1.2.3 Noun
        • 1.3 Etymology 2
          • 1.3.1 Alternative forms
          • 1.3.2 Noun
          • 1.4 Etymology 3
            • 1.4.1 Alternative forms
            • 1.4.2 Verb
            • 1.5 Anagrams
            • 2 Azerbaijani
              • 2.1 Etymology
              • 2.2 Pronunciation
              • 2.3 Noun
                • 2.3.1 Declension
                • 2.3.2 Derived terms
                • 3 Danish
                  • 3.1 Etymology
                  • 3.2 Pronunciation
                  • 3.3 Noun
                    • 3.3.1 Declension
                    • 3.4 Further reading
                    • 4 Estonian
                      • 4.1 Etymology
                      • 4.2 Pronunciation
                      • 4.3 Noun
                        • 4.3.1 Declension
                        • 5 Gothic
                          • 5.1 Romanization
                          • 6 Livonian
                            • 6.1 Alternative forms
                            • 6.2 Etymology
                            • 6.3 Pronunciation
                            • 6.4 Verb
                            • 7 Middle English
                              • 7.1 Alternative forms
                              • 7.2 Etymology
                              • 7.3 Pronunciation
                              • 7.4 Conjunction
                                • 7.4.1 Descendants
                                • 7.4.2 References
                                • 8 Norwegian Bokmål
                                  • 8.1 Etymology
                                  • 8.2 Pronunciation
                                  • 8.3 Noun
                                    • 8.3.1 Derived terms
                                    • 8.4 References
                                    • 9 Norwegian Nynorsk
                                      • 9.1 Pronunciation
                                      • 9.2 Etymology 1
                                        • 9.2.1 Noun
                                          • 9.2.1.1 Derived terms
                                          • 9.3 Etymology 2
                                            • 9.3.1 Verb
                                            • 9.4 References
                                            • 10 Old English
                                              • 10.1 Alternative forms
                                              • 10.2 Etymology
                                              • 10.3 Pronunciation
                                              • 10.4 Conjunction
                                                • 10.4.1 Synonyms
                                                • 10.4.2 Descendants
                                                • 10.5 Adverb
                                                • 11 Old Frisian
                                                  • 11.1 Alternative forms
                                                  • 11.2 Etymology
                                                  • 11.3 Conjunction
                                                    • 11.3.1 Descendants
                                                    • 12 Old Irish
                                                      • 12.1 Pronunciation
                                                      • 12.2 Pronoun
                                                      • 13 Scots
                                                        • 13.1 Conjunction
                                                        • 14 Swedish
                                                          • 14.1 Etymology
                                                          • 14.2 Pronunciation
                                                          • 14.3 Noun
                                                            • 14.3.1 Declension
                                                            • 14.3.2 Related terms
                                                            • 14.3.3 See also
                                                            • 14.4 References
                                                            • 14.5 Anagrams
                                                            • 15 Zealandic
                                                              • 15.1 Etymology
                                                              • 15.2 Noun
                                                                • 15.2.1 Alternative forms English[ edit] English Wikipedia has an article on:and Wikipedia Pronunciation[ edit]
                                                                  • ( stressed ) enPR:ănd,ĕnd IPA (key): /ænd/,/ɛnd/
                                                                  • Audio (US) (file)
                                                                  • Rhymes:-ænd,-ɛnd
                                                                  • ( unstressed ) enPR:ən(d) IPA (key): /ənd/,/ən/,/ɛn/,/ɛnd/,/n̩d/,/n̩/
                                                                  • Audio (US) (ham and eggs) (file)
                                                                  • ( unstressed or,for some speakers,stressed ) Homophone:end Etymology 1[ edit] From Middle Englishand,an,from Old Englishand,ond,end,from Proto-Germanic*andi,*anþi,from Proto-Indo-European*h₂énti ( “ facing opposite,near,in front of,before ” ) . Cognate with Scotsan ( “ and ” ),North Frisianen ( “ and ” ),West Frisianen,in ( “ and ” ),Low Germanun ( “ and ” ),Dutchen ( “ and ” ),Germanund ( “ and ” ),Danishend ( “ but ” ),Swedishän ( “ yet,but ” ),Icelandicenn ( “ still,yet ” ),Albanianedhe ( “ and ” ) (dialectalênde,ênne ),ende ( “ still,yet,therefore ” ),Latinante ( “ opposite,in front of ” ),and Ancient Greekἀντί ( antí,“ opposite,facing ” ) . Alternative forms[ edit]
                                                                    • an'
                                                                    • 'n' ( n ) Conjunction[ edit] and
                                                                      1. As a coordinating conjunction;expressing two elements to be taken together or in addition to each other.
                                                                        1. Used simply to connect two noun phrases,adjectives or adverbs.[from 8 th c.]
                                                                          • c. 1430 (reprinted1888 ),Thomas Austin,ed.,Two Fifteenth-century Cookery-books. Harleian ms. 279 (ab. 1430),&Harl. ms. 4016 (ab. 1450),with Extracts from Ashmole ms. 1429,Laud ms. 553,&Douce ms. 55[Early English Text Society,Original Series;91],London:N. Trübner&Co. for the Early English Text Society,volume I,OCLC 374760,page 11:Soupes dorye. — Take gode almaunde mylke [ …] casteþher-to Safrounan Salt [ …]
                                                                          • 1596-97,William Shakespeare,The Merchant of Venice,Act V Scene 1 Sweet lady,you have given me lifeand living; [ …]
                                                                          • 1611,The Holy Bible, [ …] (King James Version),imprinted at London:By Robert Barker, [ …],OCLC 964384981,Genesis 1:1:In the beginning God created the heavenand the earth.
                                                                          • 1817,Jane Austen,Persuasion:as for Mrs. Smith,she had claims of various kinds to recommend her quicklyand permanently.
                                                                          • 2011,Mark Townsend,The Guardian,5 November:‘The UKBA has some serious explaining to do if it is routinely carrying out such abusiveand unlawful inspections.’
                                                                          • Simply connecting two clauses or sentences.[from 8 th c.]
                                                                            • 1991,Jung Chang,Wild Swans:When she saw several boys carrying a huge wooden case full of porcelain,she mumbled to Jinming that she was going to have a look,and left the room.
                                                                            • 2011,Helena Smith&Tom Kington,The Guardian,5 November:"Consensus is essential for the country," he said,adding that he was not "tied" to his postand was willing to step aside.
                                                                            • Introducing a clause or sentence which follows on in time or consequence from the first.[from 9 th c.]
                                                                              • 1996,David Beasley,Chocolate for the Poor:‘But if you think you can get it,Christian,you're a fool. Set one foot upcountryand I'll kill you.’
                                                                              • 2004,Will Buckley,The Observer:,22 August:One more errorand all the good work she had done on Friday would be for nought.
                                                                              • ( obsolete ) Yet;but.[10 th -17 th c.]
                                                                                • 1611,Authorised (King James) Version,Bible,Matthew XXII:Hee said,I goe sir,and went not.
                                                                                • Used to connect certain numbers:connecting units when they precede tens ( not dated );connecting tens and units to hundreds,thousands etc. (now often omitted in US);to connect fractions to wholes.[from 10 th c.]
                                                                                  • 1863,Abraham Lincoln,‘Gettysburg Address’:Four scoreand seven years ago our fathers brought forth,upon this continent,a new nation,conceived in liberty,and dedicated to the proposition that "all men are created equal".
                                                                                  • 1906,Upton Sinclair,The Jungle,Chapter 26 In Chicago these latter were receiving,for the most part,eighteenand a half cents an hour,and the unions wished to make this the general wage for the next year.
                                                                                  • 1956,Dodie Smith,(title):The One Hundredand One Dalmatians.
                                                                                  • ( now colloquial or literary ) Used to connect more than two elements together in a chain,sometimes to stress the number of elements.
                                                                                    • 1623,William Shakespeare,Julius Caesar,First Folio,II.2:And these does she apply,for warningsand portents,/And euils imminent;and on her knee/ Hath begg'd,that I will stay at home to day.
                                                                                    • 1939,Langley,Ryerson&Woolf,The Wizard of Oz (screenplay):Lions,and tigers,and bears! Oh,my!
                                                                                    • Connecting two identical elements,with implications of continued or infinite repetition.[from 10 th c.]
                                                                                      • 1611,Authorised (King James) Version,Bible,Psalms CXLV:I will extol thee,my God,O king;and I will bless thy name for everand ever.
                                                                                      • 2011,Jonathan Watts,The Guardian,18 March:He was at work in a nearby city when the tsunami struck. ‘As soon as I saw it,I called home. It rangand rang,but there was no answer.’
                                                                                      • Introducing a parenthetical or explanatory clause.[from 10 th c.]
                                                                                        • 1918,George W. E. Russell,Prime Ministers and Some Others:The word "capable" occurs in Mr. Fisher's Bill,and rightly,because our mental and physical capacities are infinitely varied.
                                                                                        • 2008,The Guardian,29 Jan 2008:President Pervez Musharraf is undoubtedly sincere in his belief that he,and he alone,can save Pakistan from the twin perils of terrorism and anarchy.
                                                                                        • Introducing the continuation of narration from a previous understood point;also used alone as a question:‘and so what?’.
                                                                                          • 1611,Authorised (King James) Version,Bible,Revelation XIV:And I heard a voice from heaven,as the voice of many waters,and as the voice of a great thunder:and I heard the voice of harpers harping with their harps [ …] .
                                                                                          • 1861,Charles Dickens,Great Expectations:‘You take it smoothly now,’ said I,‘but you were very serious last night,when you swore it was Death.’ ‘And so I swear it is Death,’ said he,putting his pipe back in his mouth [ …] .
                                                                                          • 1914,Saki,‘The Lull’,Beasts and Superbeasts:‘And,Vera,’ added Mrs. Durmot,turning to her sixteen-year-old niece,‘be careful what colour ribbon you wear in your hair [ …] .’
                                                                                          • ( now regional or somewhat colloquial ) Used to connect two verbs where the second is dependent on the first:‘to’. Used especially aftercome,go andtry .[from 14 th c.]
                                                                                            • 1817,Jane Austen,Sanditon:Beyond paying her a few charming compliments and amusing her with gay conversation,had he done anything at all to tryand gain her affection?
                                                                                            • 1989,James Kelman,A Disaffection:Rememberand help yourself to the soup! called Gavin.
                                                                                            • Introducing a qualitative difference between things having the same name;"as well as other".[from 16 th c.]
                                                                                              • 1936,The Labour Monthly,vol. XVIII:Undoubtedly every party makes mistakes. But there are mistakesand mistakes.
                                                                                              • 1972,Esquire,vol. LXXVIII:"There are managersand there are managers," he tells me. "I'm totally involved in every aspect of Nina's career."
                                                                                              • Used to combine numbers in addition;plus (with singular or plural verb).[from 17 th c.]
                                                                                                • 1791,James Boswell,Life of Samuel Johnson:‘Nobody attempts to dispute that twoand two make four:but with contests concerning moral truth,human passions are generally mixed [ …] .’
                                                                                                • 1871,Lewis Carroll,Through the Looking-Glass,and What Alice Found There:‘Can you do Addition?’ the White Queen asked. ‘What's oneand oneand oneand oneand oneand oneand oneand oneand oneand one?’
                                                                                                • ( heading )Expressing a condition.
                                                                                                  1. ( now US dialect ) If;provided that.[from 13 th c.]
                                                                                                    • 1485,Sir Thomas Malory,Le Morte Darthur,Book VII:"Where ys Sir Launcelot?" seyde King Arthure. "And he were here,he wolde nat grucche to do batayle for you."
                                                                                                    • 1526,William Tyndale,trans.Bible,Matthew XIV:Peter answered,and sayde:master,and thou be he,bidde me come unto the on the water.
                                                                                                    • 1958,Shirley Ann Grau,The Hard Blue Sky:"And he went slower," Mike said softly,"he go better."
                                                                                                    • ( obsolete ) As if,as though.[15 th -17 th c.]
                                                                                                      • 1600,William Shakespeare,A Midsummer Night's Dream,I.2:I will roare you,and 'twere any Nightingale.
                                                                                                      • (Can we date this quote by Francis Bacon and provide title,author's full name,and other details?) As they will set an house on fire,and it were but to roast their eggs. Quotations[ edit]
                                                                                                        • For quotations of use of this term,see Citations:and. Usage notes[ edit] Usage notes
                                                                                                          1. Beginning a sentence withand or other coordinating conjunctions is considered incorrect by classical grammarians arguing that a coordinating conjunction at the start of a sentence has nothing to connect,but use of the word in this way is very common. The practice will be found in literature from Anglo-Saxon times onwards,especially as an aid to continuity in narrative and dialogue. TheOED provides examples from the 9 th century to the 19 th century,including one from Shakespeare’sKing John:“Arthur . Must you with hot Irons,burne out both mine eyes?Hubert. Young boy,I must.Arthur . And will you?Hubert . And I will.” It is also used for other rhetorical purposes,especially to denote surprise
                                                                                                            (O John! and you have seen him! And are you really going?—1884 inOED ) and sometimes just to introduce an improvised afterthought
                                                                                                            (I’m going to swim. And don’t you dare watch—G. Butler,1983) It is,however,poor style to separate short statements into separate sentences when no special effect is needed:I opened the door and I looked into the room (not*I opened the door. And I looked into the room ). Combining sentences or starting within addition ormoreover is preferred in formal writing.
                                                                                                          2. And is often omitted for contextual effects of various kinds,especially between sequences of descriptive adjectives which can be separated by commas or simply by spaces
                                                                                                            (The teeming jerrybuilt dun-coloured traffic-ridden deafening city—Penelope Lively,1987)And all is a well-established tag added to the end of a statement,as in
                                                                                                            Isn’t it amazing? He has a Ph.D. and all—J. Shute,1992 With the nominal meaning “also,besides,in addition”,the use has origins in dialect,as can be seen from the material from many regions given in theEnglish Dialect Dictionary (often written in special ways,e.g.,ano',an'-all,an' a' ). In many of the examples it seems to lack any perceptible lexical meaning and to be just a rhythmical device to eke out a sentence. Synonyms[ edit]
                                                                                                            • ( used to connect two similar words or phrases ):as well as,together with,in addition to
                                                                                                            • ( informal ):&,'n',+ Translations[ edit] See and/translations § Conjunction Noun[ edit] and (pluralands )
                                                                                                              1. ( music, often informal ) In rhythm,the second half of a divided beat.
                                                                                                                • 2006,Goodwin,Gordon,Gordon Goodwin's Big Phat Band:Trumpet,page 51:The same goes for measure 42,when you begin the phrase on theand of 1,because that kind of lick can easily bog down the time. Etymology 2[ edit] From Middle Englishande,from Old Englishanda ( “ grudge,enmity,malice,envy,hatred,anger,zeal,annoyance,vexation;zeal;injury,mischief;fear,horror ” ) and Old Norseandi ( “ breath,wind,spirit ” );both from Proto-Germanic*anadô ( “ breath,anger,zeal ” ),from Proto-Indo-European*h₂enh₁- ( “ to breathe,blow ” ) . Cognate with GermanAhnd,And ( “ woe,grief ” ),Danishånde ( “ breath ” ),Swedishanda,ande ( “ spirit,breath,wind,ingenuity,intellect ” ),Icelandicandi ( “ spirit ” ),Albanianëndë ( “ pleasure,delight ” ),Latinanimus ( “ spirit,soul ” ) . Related toonde . Alternative forms[ edit]
                                                                                                                  • aynd,eind,eynd,yane,end Noun[ edit] and (pluralands )
                                                                                                                    1. ( Britain dialectal ) Breath.
                                                                                                                    2. ( Britain dialectal ) Sea smoke;steam fog. Etymology 3[ edit] From Middle Englishanden,from Old Englishandian ( “ to be envious or jealous,envy ” ) and Old Norseanda ( “ to breathe ” );both from Proto-Germanic*anadōną ( “ to breathe,sputter ” ) . Cognate with Germanahnden ( “ to avenge,punish ” ),Danishånde ( “ to breathe ” ),Swedishandas ( “ to breathe ” ),Icelandicanda ( “ to breathe ” ) . See above. Alternative forms[ edit]
                                                                                                                      • eind,eynd,ein Verb[ edit] and (third-person singular simple presentands,present participleanding,simple past and past participleanded )
                                                                                                                        1. ( Britain dialectal, intransitive ) To breathe;whisper;devise;imagine. Anagrams[ edit]
                                                                                                                          • ADN,DAN,DNA,Dan,Dan.,NAD,NDA,dan,dna,nad Azerbaijani[ edit] Other scripts Cyrillic анд Roman and Perso-Arabic آند‎Etymology[ edit] From Proto-Turkic*Ānt ( “ oath ” ) . Cognate with Old Turkic𐰦‎( nt ),Turkishant . Pronunciation[ edit]
                                                                                                                            • IPA (key): [and] Noun[ edit] and (definite accusativeandı,pluralandlar )
                                                                                                                              1. oath Declension[ edit] Declension ofand singularplural nominative and andlar definite accusative andı andları dative anda andlara locative andda andlarda ablative anddan andlardan definite genitive andın andların Possessive forms ofand nominative singularplural mənim (“my”) andım andlarım sənin (“your”) andın andların onun (“his/her/its”) andı andları bizim (“our”) andımız andlarımız sizin (“your”) andınız andlarınız onların (“their”) andı or andları andları accusative singularplural mənim (“my”) andımı andlarımı sənin (“your”) andını andlarını onun (“his/her/its”) andını andlarını bizim (“our”) andımızı andlarımızı sizin (“your”) andınızı andlarınızı onların (“their”) andını or andlarını andlarını dative singularplural mənim (“my”) andıma andlarıma sənin (“your”) andına andlarına onun (“his/her/its”) andına andlarına bizim (“our”) andımıza andlarımıza sizin (“your”) andınıza andlarınıza onların (“their”) andına or andlarına andlarına locative singularplural mənim (“my”) andımda andlarımda sənin (“your”) andında andlarında onun (“his/her/its”) andında andlarında bizim (“our”) andımızda andlarımızda sizin (“your”) andınızda andlarınızda onların (“their”) andında or andlarında andlarında ablative singularplural mənim (“my”) andımdan andlarımdan sənin (“your”) andından andlarından onun (“his/her/its”) andından andlarından bizim (“our”) andımızdan andlarımızdan sizin (“your”) andınızdan andlarınızdan onların (“their”) andından or andlarından andlarından genitive singularplural mənim (“my”) andımın andlarımın sənin (“your”) andının andlarının onun (“his/her/its”) andının andlarının bizim (“our”) andımızın andlarımızın sizin (“your”) andınızın andlarınızın onların (“their”) andının or andlarının andlarının Derived terms[ edit]
                                                                                                                                • and içmək ( “ to take an oath ” ) Danish[ edit] Etymology[ edit] From Old Norseǫnd,from Proto-Germanic*anadz,from Proto-Indo-European*h₂enh₁-ti- ( “ duck ” ) . Pronunciation[ edit]
                                                                                                                                  • IPA (key): /and/,[anˀ]
                                                                                                                                  • Rhymes:-and Noun[ edit] and (singular definiteanden,plural indefiniteænder )
                                                                                                                                    1. duck
                                                                                                                                    2. canard (false or misleading report or story) Declension[ edit] Declension ofand common
                                                                                                                                      genderSingularPluralindefinitedefiniteindefinitedefinitenominative and anden ænder ændernegenitive ands andens ænders ændernes Further reading[ edit]
                                                                                                                                      • “and” inDen Danske Ordbog Estonian[ edit] Etymology[ edit] From the root ofandma . Cognate with Finnishanti . Pronunciation[ edit]
                                                                                                                                        • IPA (key): /ɑnʲˑt/ Noun[ edit] and (genitiveanni,partitiveandi )
                                                                                                                                          1. offering,gift
                                                                                                                                          2. alms,donation
                                                                                                                                          3. giftedness,talent
                                                                                                                                          4. act of giving Declension[ edit] Declension of and (type paks) singular plural nominative and annid genitive anni andide partitive andi ande / andisid illative andi / annisse andidesse inessive annis andides elative annist andidest allative annile andidele adessive annil andidel ablative annilt andidelt translative anniks andideks terminative annini andideni essive annina andidena abessive annita andideta comitative anniga andidega Gothic[ edit] Romanization[ edit] and
                                                                                                                                            1. Romanization of𐌰𐌽𐌳 Livonian[ edit] Alternative forms[ edit]
                                                                                                                                              • ( Courland ) andõ Etymology[ edit] From Proto-Finnic*antadak,from Proto-Uralic*ëmta- . Pronunciation[ edit]
                                                                                                                                                • IPA (key): /ɑnd/ Verb[ edit] and
                                                                                                                                                  1. ( Salaca ) to give Middle English[ edit] Alternative forms[ edit]
                                                                                                                                                    • ant,an,en,⁊,&Etymology[ edit] From Old Englishand,ond,end,from Proto-Germanic*andi,from Proto-Indo-European*h₂énti . Pronunciation[ edit]
                                                                                                                                                      • IPA (key): /and/
                                                                                                                                                      • ( unstressed ) IPA (key): /an/,/ɛn/ Conjunction[ edit] and
                                                                                                                                                        1. and,and then ( connects two elements of a sentence )
                                                                                                                                                          • 1200,Ormin,“Dedication”,in Ormulum,lines 1-4:Nu broþerr Wallterr broþerr min/ Affterrþe flæshess kinde/⁊ broþerr min i Crisstendom/ Þurrh fulluhht⁊þurrh trowwþe [ …] Now,brother Walter,my brother/ by way of blood relation/and my brother in Christendom/ through baptisingand through faith [ …] 1340,Dan Michel,“Þe oþer Godes Heste”,in Ayenbite of Inwyt:Acþe ilke/þet zuereþ hidousliche be god/ oþer by his halȝen/and him to-breȝþ/and zayþ him sclondres/þet ne byeþ naȝt to zigge:þe ilke zeneȝeþ dyadliche [ …] But one who/ hideously swears by God/ or by his emissaries/and who tears him apart/while saying to him lies/ that shouldn't be said:they sin grievously. [ …] 1380,Sir Firumbras,lines 4413-4414:"Lordes",quaþ Richard,"Buþ noȝt agast,Ac holdeþ forþ ȝour way/an hast&boldeliche doþ ȝour dede [ …] " "Lords",said Richard,"Don't be frightened,but hold your way forwards/and quickly and boldy do your deed [ …] "1382,John Wycliffe,“Apocalips 1:8”,in Wycliffe's Bible:Yhe,Amen! Y am alpha and oo,the bigynnyng and the ende,seith the Lord God,that is,and that was,and that is to comynge,almyȝti. You,Amen! I am Alpha and O,the beginning and the end,says the Lord God;that is,that was,and that which will come,almighty.1400,Geoffrey Chaucer,“General Prologue”,in The Canterbury Tales,lines 1-3:Whan that Aprill,with his shoures soote/,The droghte of March hath perced to the roote/And bathed every veyne in swich licour [ …] When that April,with its sweet showers/ Has pierced March's drought to the root/And bathed every vein in such fluid [ …]
                                                                                                                                                          • however,yet,but,though. while
                                                                                                                                                          • if,supposing that,whether.
                                                                                                                                                          • ( rare ) As though,like,in a manner suggesting. Descendants[ edit]
                                                                                                                                                            • English:and
                                                                                                                                                            • Scots:an References[ edit]
                                                                                                                                                              • “and (conj. (&adv.))” in MED Online,Ann Arbor,Mich.:University of Michigan,2007,retrieved 2019-01-14 . Norwegian Bokmål[ edit] Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:ender Wikipedia no Etymology[ edit] From Old Norseǫnd,from Proto-Germanic*anadz,from Proto-Indo-European*h₂enh₁-ti- ( “ duck ” ) . Pronunciation[ edit]
                                                                                                                                                                • IPA (key): /ɑnː/,/ɑnd/
                                                                                                                                                                • and (file) This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some! Noun[ edit] and or (definite singularandaoranden,indefinite pluralender,definite pluralendene )
                                                                                                                                                                  1. a duck
                                                                                                                                                                  2. canard (false or misleading report or story) Derived terms[ edit]
                                                                                                                                                                    • Andeby ( “ Duckburg ” )
                                                                                                                                                                    • andunge References[ edit]
                                                                                                                                                                      • “and” inThe Bokmål Dictionary . Norwegian Nynorsk[ edit] Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:and Wikipedia nn Pronunciation[ edit]
                                                                                                                                                                        • IPA (key): /ɑnː/,/ɑnd/ Etymology 1[ edit] From Old Norseǫnd,from Proto-Germanic*anadz,from Proto-Indo-European*h₂enh₁-ti- ( “ duck ” ) . Akin to Englishennet . Noun[ edit] and (definite singularanda,indefinite pluralender,definite pluralendene )
                                                                                                                                                                          1. a duck ( waterbird ) Derived terms[ edit]
                                                                                                                                                                            • Andeby ( “ Duckburg ” )
                                                                                                                                                                            • andunge Etymology 2[ edit] Verb[ edit] and
                                                                                                                                                                              1. imperative ofanda References[ edit]
                                                                                                                                                                                • “and” inThe Nynorsk Dictionary . Old English[ edit] Alternative forms[ edit]
                                                                                                                                                                                  • ond,end Etymology[ edit] From Proto-Germanic*anda,*andi,probably from Proto-Indo-European*h₂énti ( “ facing opposite,near,in front of,before ” ) . Compare Old Frisianand,Old Saxonendi,Old High Germanunti,Old Norseenn . Pronunciation[ edit]
                                                                                                                                                                                    • IPA (key): /ɑnd/ Conjunction[ edit] and
                                                                                                                                                                                      1. and Synonyms[ edit]
                                                                                                                                                                                        • ⁊ ( symbol ) Descendants[ edit]
                                                                                                                                                                                          • Middle English:and,an,en
                                                                                                                                                                                            • Scots:an
                                                                                                                                                                                            • English:and Adverb[ edit] and
                                                                                                                                                                                              1. even;also Old Frisian[ edit] Alternative forms[ edit]
                                                                                                                                                                                                • ande,ende Etymology[ edit] From Proto-Germanic*andi,from Proto-Indo-European*h₂énti ( “ facing opposite,near,in front of,before ” ) . Compare Old Englishand,Old Saxonendi,Old High Germanunti,Old Norseenn . Conjunction[ edit] and
                                                                                                                                                                                                  1. and Descendants[ edit]
                                                                                                                                                                                                    • North Frisian:en
                                                                                                                                                                                                    • Saterland Frisian:un
                                                                                                                                                                                                    • West Frisian:en,in Old Irish[ edit] Pronunciation[ edit]
                                                                                                                                                                                                      • IPA (key): /an͈d/ Pronoun[ edit] and
                                                                                                                                                                                                        1. third-person singular masculine/ neuter dative ofi:in him,in it
                                                                                                                                                                                                          • c.875,Milan Glosses on the Psalms,published inThesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987,Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies),edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan,vol. I,pp. 7–483, Ml. 31 b 23 in bélrai .i. isand atá gním tengad isind huiliu labramar-ni of speech,i.e. the action of the tongue is in it,in all that we say Scots[ edit] Conjunction[ edit] and
                                                                                                                                                                                                            1. Alternative form ofan Swedish[ edit] Etymology[ edit] From Old Norseǫnd,from Proto-Germanic*anadz,from Proto-Indo-European*h₂énh₂t- ( “ duck ” ) . Pronunciation[ edit]
                                                                                                                                                                                                              • IPA (key): /and/
                                                                                                                                                                                                              • audio (file) Noun[ edit] and 
                                                                                                                                                                                                                1. a wild duck Declension[ edit] Declension ofand Singular Plural Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite Nominative and anden änder änderna Genitive ands andens änders ändernas Related terms[ edit]
                                                                                                                                                                                                                  • andfågel
                                                                                                                                                                                                                  • andjakt
                                                                                                                                                                                                                  • andmat
                                                                                                                                                                                                                  • andrake
                                                                                                                                                                                                                  • andsträck
                                                                                                                                                                                                                  • andunge
                                                                                                                                                                                                                  • gräsand See also[ edit]
                                                                                                                                                                                                                    • anka ( domesticated duck ) References[ edit]
                                                                                                                                                                                                                      • and inSvenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL) Anagrams[ edit]
                                                                                                                                                                                                                        • -nad,Dan,dan Zealandic[ edit] Etymology[ edit] From Middle Dutchhant,from Old Dutchhant,from Proto-Germanic*handuz . Noun[ edit] and (plural[please provide] )
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          1. hand Alternative forms[ edit]
                                                                                                                                                                                                                            • 'and


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